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Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)
reach out to the local bar. law firms like jim's law firm or chris's law firm help us in situations where we are trying to establish counsel and reinforce. we get over a thousand cases a year. from that first request we are usually able to take it down to about half. many of them who are writing to us are not claiming to be innocent. they are probably claiming that their prison conditions are inadequate and they are probably right. they might be claiming that they haven't received their medication, they are probably right. they are probably -- they often complaining that they were overcharged and over sentence. they probably right. we refer them as much as we can to those that might be able to help them. from then we begin the triage process to see if there is any kind of assistance once we investigate and if we are able to litigate it. >> thank you. next i would like to ask jim, poor people who are accused of a crime have a right to a public defender but most of the cases are in civil court, child custody, workers right, compensation for catastrophic injuries. where is the combid
. knows nothing about the hear say rule, nothing about the law. she wonders the halls like their dead. i have seen it. it's out there and it's not right. it's unacceptable. when the hearing is over, she's denied all connection to her daughter. that is what we are talking about. >> what do you think it's going to take to make society in government to take the step towards gideon and it's what we've talked about. you have worked on this for many years? >> and the bar association that is represented today. i think we are proud of our city, whatever city might be here today. we are all proud of our city. i like this city because we get ideas here that nobody else gets. some of them are really bad. we are all friends here. right? so, our little committee, we are powerless in this culture. forget about it. we have no cloud. so our slogan is, we don't think, we do. because we don't want to study things. there are people out there studying things. so we want to a supervisor. david chu, in this city, we said here is the problem and he said that is terrible. he's a practicing lawyer and we went f
of learning cross-examination skills and of learning the law. what we do is teach lawyers to adopt values that are missing in the system. we give them strategies when they confront challenges in the system to overcome those challenges instilling values in them and we have a membership community that reinforces to try to do that and the goal is when they are raiseing the standard of interpretation. in 10 years one of them will be sitting at that table, one of them will get that question an they will answer it correctly. i don't have enough resources. the movement is about teaching people to be better lawyers today but also building an army of people across the region and ultimately across the country who will work their ways into positions of power where they are leading public defenders offices and hiring people behind them to do what you do all the time, jeff, you are out there telling people that public defenders matter. [ applause ] >> believe me, it's always a struggle. i see my budget analyst telling me right here. you talk about reaching policy makers and politician and elected offi
and terrorist groups. leven said to hold him under these circumstances would be contrary to our laws and jeopardize our effort to prosecute him. during interviews before suspects are read their rights is often not admissible during the trial. the issue on miranda rights is further complicated because the u.s. is a u.s. citizen. many of the rules cannot be used on americans. live in the newsroom, katie utehs. ktvu news. >>> people are in texas are being allowed in their homes. curfew is still in effect and there is limited water and electricity. many are still trying to learn the condition of family and friends hurt in the explosion. >> it's really hectic, but we are patient because we know the extent of damage on the other side. and we got friends and family that we don't know about over there. >> 14 people died in the fertilizer plant explosion, including 11 emergency responders. 200 more were injured. >>> this weekend, texas is also remembering the deadly raid on the branch compound in waco. 76 people died in a fire twenty years ago following a raid on the compound. waco and west
immigration laws, i believe that i.c.e. will play a critical role. these reductions there could undermine our efforts to implement new reforms. i'm sure we'll revisit this during the course of the hearing. we also need to do a better job of managing our detention efforts to ensure that criminals are kept off the streets while acknowledging that the squeft ration that congress -- esqueft ration that congress launch -- sequestration that congress launched is partly to blame. another area of concern is the $714 million request to fund the construction of the national bio anding a row defense facilities in kansas. we've talked about. this i'm sure we'll talk about it more today the and i understand the importance of studying animal diseases, but i hope we can avoid providing full funding, $700 million some, full funding, to 2014 alone, for a multi-year construction probably. y building a building in lodge cal segments, taking away resources from other facilities like i.c.e. and the coast guard and fema, maybe even management moneys that we need from the department. and finally, i'm concerned by p
phone records, websites, and associates, the fbi found no ties to terrorists. by law, monitoring had to stop barring new negative information. the fbi was no longer watching. after tamerlan returned from a six-month trip to russia, a dark side began emerged. he was charged in cambridge with beating a former girlfriend. started uploading videos. authorities never saw this coming. [ explosion ] some investigators believed tamerlan was the leader and convinced his younger brother to embrace jihad. george? >> let's get more from abc legal analyst dan abrams. and former special agent for the fbi brad garrett. we now know that dzhokhar is answering some questions in writing. the fbi wants to know, is anybody else involved? >> right. the real trick with that, george, is figuring out where his mind is. what is his motivation? why does he want to talk to us? is he being truthful or not? getting him over that hump and saying, okay, it's okay to talk to us, it's really your only avenue to a better situation maybe. th cld take a lo period of time. >> and dan, how much longer can this questioning
, law enforcement officials are keeping a very close eye on the internet, specifically sites that show people how to make destructive devices. nbc's senior investigative correspondent lisa myers has that part of the story, good morning. >> matt, good morning to you. regardless of who committed this atrocity it's clear these days that anyone with a grievance and the will can learn how to become a terrorist simply by going online. now authorities are trying to use some of these sites to their advantage. the latest evidence bomb makers have taken their teachings to the web this online al qaeda publication posted last month, a guide to carrying out terror attacks including detailed illustrated recipes for pressure cooker bombs, the kind investigators say was used in boston. >> the internet has brought terrorism to the web. it's made it go viral. anybody can look online and find out how to make a bomb. it is a frightening development. >> a similar terrorist manual, how to make a bomb in the kitchen of your mom, was posted three years ago. prosecutors say it was used by this former muslim-am
by will you -- must include the contributions of the transgendered? by law. you will have to have pages on transgendered contributions. people who were crossed over sex, or dressed in the other sex. clothing. isn't that absurd? isn't that totalitarian? i thought the purpose of the textbook was to tell the truth, not make groups feel good. but as i point out in the book, leftism is overwhelmingly rooted in feelings. >> host: dennis prager is the author. "still the best hope" is the name of his recent best seller. louis from florida, you're on the air. you're talking with dennis prager. >> caller: i'd like to ask mr. prayinger and his ilk what he just said about truth, why should people believe the bible when that's the biggest novel ever written? who believes the earth is 5,000 years old? how can you follow a book that tells you the world is 5,000 years old and hisclass commentary about the christian schools and the seminary, how does he say something like that and he wants to be honest? i know this man is a right winger, and he wouldn't fifth credit to anybody, but my main question is,
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)